Digimon and Divination?

It is a grey day. Warm with snowflakes like glitter. Someone down the hall seems to be having a workroom party, which they are all quite content with; you can just tell by the laughter. But we are instead lost in a different world; a digital world, if you will. One with so much information compiled and cross-linked that it encompasses the realm of human experience, and encodes the most significant events, works, and experiences as data. It is a place where you can indulge in the works of a man who lived in the 1600’s, and divine new secrets 400 years later. When you really think about it, it is fantastic; unbelievable almost.
Yet, at the same time it is another new day in the Humanities, and a lot of planning done. Today was devoted to pre-project-planning (say that three times fast). Although there were not too many new discoveries, there was the exploration and expansion of the old ones. Monk; of course, is a mining tool, meaning that the more you work the more you will discover. As is, I have been finding more uses for the NaiveBayes and decision tree tools. They might be unconventional, and a little hit-or-miss, but the results are pretty exciting!
In the classification tool you can find NaiveBayes. Under which you load your worksets and rate them. I found that rating each scene with a theme will give me the words that make the predicted theme true or false. Thus, searching for confirmation of the theme “madness,” elicits words that have some cryptic connection with that theme. Such as the word “armour,” which has to do with the armour of the mind… From there, you have to make some good old fashion English major connections and argue your findings; something that we are all experts at. My idea is that the armour of the mind refers to its sanity.. which is slowly broken down by lies. Etc.
Anyway, you get the point. This is what my program is best at in comparison to the other programs. They have the frequency, concordance, and description tools, but this seems to be a unique feature of Monk. The biggest question now is if it can be useful enough to present. That is the question for next time.

The words are supposed to be suggestive in conjunction to "madness"

It is not the most succinct method of analysis, but there is still time to work with it, and it does prove to be interesting every time. For example, “black” appears five times in Act 3, and it is always in a very negative context:

Results for "Black"

In case you were wondering about the title and the bit of writing at the beginning, it just occurred to me that the premise of one of my absolute favourite childhood shows has an abstract relation to the Digital Humanities. That show was Digimon (I know, I know), where an alternate dimension that housed a world made in the image of the earth, with fictional-type-monster inhabitants existed. If you know the show you might remember that the digital world was created by the compilation of data that is stored in computers and over the internet. First the foundations were laid, and “Over the ensuing years, through the continued growth of the electronic communications network on Earth, the Digital World continued to expand and grow,” (http://digimon.wikia.com/wiki/Digital_World) It’s a little bit silly, but it is an accurate depiction of not only the information amassed on the internet, but of the Digital Humanities itself, which must hold significant portions of the literature that shapes the world we live in. Literature is made in the image of the earth and of human experience, and the characters that inhabit it are in the image of its creatures. The depth that it reaches to is too far to count. It is too far a stretch to say that the universe of data is alternate to the universe of reality?
Just a thought.

Where does the world end and data begins?

5 thoughts on “Digimon and Divination?

  1. What are the chances that you can relate Digital Humanities to a childhood favorite? It’s like it was meant to be. Also, that was most likely my group that was laughing, I apologize if we were being too loud (we’ve gotten a complaint before….) Anyways. Glad to see that you not only got some use out of Monk, but were able to use the Decision Tree! Looking forward to your group’s presentation.

  2. I love your post! I really enjoyed your writing style and your reference to Digimon LOL.
    Nice ending quote also: ” It is too far a stretch to say that the universe of data is alternate to the universe of reality?”. Eery

  3. Kelsey!
    I love your title! It is quite clever!
    I also really like the way you opened the post, so creative! Looking forward to your presentation!

    Richelle

  4. Kelsey! I am super impressed with how deep you’re digging into the mysterious words of Hamlet, and shockingly enough, that Monk has actually deemed itself useful for you!

  5. You guys are so nice! I am so glad people enjoyed reading it, and also to find people who remember the Digital World. Thank you for your support, you wonderful people, and good luck on the final post!

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