Naive and Decisive actually sums up a lot of MONK!

Phase 2, and a new light… hopefully.

Being the expert on MONK is a tough job. Luckily the bond that comes from quizzically hitting buttons and keys for 9 hours is not an easy one to break. My project screen looks well used and familiar-

The results go on and on. Do we know what all of them mean? Not really 🙂 but we like them.

Meeting the new group in person really revealed how much the other groups liked or disagreed with their tools as well, and the hope is that what one tool lacks, the others will fill. So far we have had an easy time agreeing on regulations and sharing stories, so things are looking good for acing this presentation in a different way than the first, (though my phase one group was completely amazing, and I will miss them).

As for MONK – let’s just say not much has changed, except – the Act! Act 3 is my personal favourite act. Insanity, insults, murder, confrontation, blood, more ghosts, and much more! Really though, it just always seems like the most action packed of all the Acts!
Monk is doing its best to help me support this idea. The word “madness” shows up nine times alone in this Act! Although I did discover a slight annoyance again. I could not get the program to look through a whole act, only through the scenes. So far this is only in “Edit Worksets,” so it could just be a glitch.

Other words that show up quite a bit? Time which shows up 10 times, and “Heaven” shows up 10 times! “Action” – 6. “Go” – 17. Death and murdrer show up quite a bit too, but or course the words pertaining to the future, and action-y words show up more often, which at the very least could tell us that this Act appears in the middle of the play.

I had a very cool discovery too! In the classification tool with NaiveBayes and Decision tree (which you either understand or you do not, there is not much in between) I was able to load my Act 3 workset, which features each scene of act 3 as a different document meaning I can compare them! This is perfect for this Phase!

I rated each act as either comedy or tragedy:

As you can see, scene 1 and 2 have slightly comedic tendencies, and scene 3, being of course about sending a man to heaven or hell, is not a comedy at all… and scene 4 is an absolutely confirmed tragedy, go figure. Anyway, I think this is brilliant! Let us continue…

Now all I have changed is scene 3 from comedy to tragedy:

This is amazing because it seems like Naive Bayes uses the document as points of comparison. Scene 1 is supposed to be less of a comedy than before if scene 3 is a strong tragedy. That makes sense! In conjunction with plotting the murder or the “King,” the word “King” in the first scene seems to be associated with much deeper, darker meanings… Intriguing…

I could honestly go on about this forever, but I doubt every one of my findings would be as interesting for everyone. In summary this just means that I have a way to directly look at all of the scenes together, and that is worth a lot! Anyway, our self assigned homework for the weekend was to read all of each other’s blog posts, and see what we deduce from them, what would work with each other’s programs, etc. The hope is that through self-education we will have a breakthrough in compatibility capabilities… if that makes any sense. I am looking forward to exploring more of my new discovery, and am really going to think about how it can help my group members; that is my self assigned homework for the week. At the very least I can show off my new discovery next time and hope that they think it is as cool as I do.

Until next time, Kelsey ^.^

One thought on “Naive and Decisive actually sums up a lot of MONK!

  1. THIS IS BRILLIANT!! Being able to compare the scenes individually is so useful (who knew MONK had the capabilities of being a helpful tool?). Thanks for sharing!

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